About

Human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels to power our homes and businesses and changes to the land caused by the rise of modern cities and expanded agriculture, undoubtedly affect the global environment. It is the extent of that effect and how it relates to changes in the modern climate which is the subject of current scientific debate.

Wise, effective climate policy flows from a sound scientific foundation and a clear understanding of what science does and does not tell us about human influence and about courses of action to manage risk. Many of the temperature data and computer models used to predict climate change are themselves as uncertain as are our understanding of important interactions in the natural climate.

Are calls about the uncertainty in the state of scientific knowledge a call for no action? Nothing could be further from the truth. The message to policy makers is not to delay actions until uncertainties are reduced. Rather, actions should flow from the state of knowledge, should be related to a long-term strategy and objectives and should be capable of being adjusted- one way or the other- as the understanding of human influences improves. There is a sufficient basis for action because the climate change risk is real. Yet it is equally true that actions must not be predicated on speculative images of an apocalyptic vision of life in the near future.

Latest Climate Change Articles

What if Boston Had Record Low Snowfall?

By yesterday evening, Boston officially received its greatest seasonal snowfall on record, 108.6 inches. The popular meme is that this is just one more example of human-caused climate change. But unless you are in elementary school, or just don’t pay attention to what scientists or Al Gore say, you will remember when global warming was […]

Even Though Warming Has Stopped, it Keeps Getting Worse?

I was updating a U.S. Corn Belt summer temperature and precipitation dataset from the NCDC website, and all of a sudden the no-warming-trend-since-1900 turned into a significant warming trend. As can be seen in the following chart, the largest adjustments were to earlier years in the dataset, which were made colder. The change in the […]

Disclosure Standards for All, Not Some

The recent controversy caused by Greenpeace’s release of documents about Willie Soon is another example of Red Queen justice—verdict first, trial later—and the witch-hunt tactics of the climate establishment. In the 1690s, witches were burned at the stake. Today, the accused witches are destroyed by journalistic recklessness. The best response to Greenpeace and the media […]

Climate Skepticism: Today’s Witch Hunt and McCarthyism

Although the Salem witch trials took place in the 1690s, witch hunts are still used as a tactic of social persecution and a means to censure and demonize those who do not conform to the climate orthodoxy. From Salem to McCarthyism to today’s increasingly strident attacks on so called “climate skeptics,” witch -hunts are a […]

What We Are Reading

Feisty Ala. climate change critic claims Washington is trying to intimidate him

An Alabama atmospheric scientist who has gained a global reputation as a repudiator of “mainstream climate science” strongly defended his research record at the University of Alabama, Huntsville (UAH), where he is a distinguished professor and director of the university’s Earth System Science Center.

FEMA Tells Oklahoma to Do the Impossible … Or Else

Last fall, the Federal Emergency Management Agency issued a draft proposal that will require Oklahoma to do the impossible or face the loss of disaster relief funds. Specifically, state governments will be required to assess the risk of future disasters in a changing climate.

Spatial uncertainty in bias corrected climate change projections and hydrogeological impacts

The question of which climate model bias correction methods and spatial scales for correction are optimal for both projecting future hydrological changes as well as removing initial model bias has so far received little attention. For 11 climate models (CMs), or CM – Global/Regional Climate Model pairing, this paper analyses the relationship between complexity and robustness of three distribution based scaling (DBS) bias correction methods applied to daily precipitation at various spatial scales.

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