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climate Security Mar '14
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About

Human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels to power our homes and businesses and changes to the land caused by the rise of modern cities and expanded agriculture, undoubtedly affect the global environment. It is the extent of that effect and how it relates to changes in the modern climate which is the subject of current scientific debate.

Wise, effective climate policy flows from a sound scientific foundation and a clear understanding of what science does and does not tell us about human influence and about courses of action to manage risk. Many of the temperature data and computer models used to predict climate change are themselves as uncertain as are our understanding of important interactions in the natural climate.

Are calls about the uncertainty in the state of scientific knowledge a call for no action? Nothing could be further from the truth. The message to policy makers is not to delay actions until uncertainties are reduced. Rather, actions should flow from the state of knowledge, should be related to a long-term strategy and objectives and should be capable of being adjusted- one way or the other- as the understanding of human influences improves. There is a sufficient basis for action because the climate change risk is real. Yet it is equally true that actions must not be predicated on speculative images of an apocalyptic vision of life in the near future.

Latest Climate Change Articles

15 Years of CERES Versus Surface Temperature: Climate Sensitivity = 1.3 deg. C

The NASA CERES project has updated their EBAF-TOA Edition 2.8 radiative flux dataset through March of 2015, which now extends the global CERES record to just over 15 years (since March 2000, starting with NASA’s Terra satellite). This allows us to get an update of how the radiative budget of the Earth responds to surface […]

New Pause-Busting Temperature Dataset Implies Only 1.5 C Climate Sensitivity

Amid all of the debate over whether the global warming pause/hiatus exists or not, I’d like to bring people back to a central issue: Even if it has warmed in the last 15 years, the rate of surface warming (and deep-ocean warming) we have seen in the last 50 years still implies low climate sensitivity. […]

Revised UAH Global Temperature Update for June 2015: +0.33 deg. C.

We discovered there were several days during June when communication problems prevented the transfer of some of the raw satellite data to our computer. This is an update of the June 2015 numbers with the missing satellite data included. The Version 6.0 global average lower tropospheric temperature (LT) anomaly for June, 2015 is +0.33 deg. […]

Demonization: The Death of Civil Discourse

Presidential campaigns and daily coverage of candidates are a stark reminder that politics has become a blood sport where demonization is the coin of the realm. Candidates and their campaigns spend too little time discussing their views on issues and programs and too much time following the principle of “go negative early”. Civil discourse is […]

What We Are Reading

World’s largest climate research site pilots integrated modeling

The next generation of equipment is coming to the world’s largest climate research facility, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) field measurement site near Lamont, Oklahoma. The instruments will soon support integrated modeling of clouds, aerosols and the earth’s surface. Rather than examining these factors in isolation, SGP scientists are interested in probing coupled interactions, which will advance research in a variety of fields—from climate change, to meteorology, to agriculture.

Cataclysmic Cosmic Collision Triggered Global Cooling about12,800 Years Ago

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago­ — give or take a few centuries — a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas. New research by UC Santa Barbara geologist James Kennett and an international group of investigators has narrowed the date to a 100-year range, sometime between 12,835 and 12,735 years ago. The team’s findings appear today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

American Innovation Can We Turn CO2 Into Fuel?

The boundary between science and science fiction is blurring, as researchers are hard at work developing methods to capture the problematic greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from our atmosphere and turn it into diesel.

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