Articles Tagged: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

U.S. Energy Exports Are Fundamental Global Energy Security

Very rarely does Congress put the level of effort and attention into one topic as they have in debating domestic energy exports. But rightfully so. The shale oil and natural gas revolution has dramatically changed the U.S. energy portfolio in ways most could not have predicted and our current policies tuned to the notion of […]

An inviting opportunity for the American energy renaissance

Last month the White House submitted President Obama’s annual economic report to Congress. Nestled in the findings is a compelling case for lifting the country’s antiquated ban on natural gas exports. “An increase in U.S. exports of natural gas, and the resulting price changes, would have a number of mostly beneficial effects,” the report states, […]

Analyzing Energy Policy Trends

President Nixon, in his 1974 State of the Union Address, declared: “Let this be our national goal: At the end of this decade … the United States will not be dependent on any other country for the energy we need …”[1] Since then, every US president, regardless of party, has echoed the need for energy […]

Presentation by Stephen Eule on Energy Policy

Presentation by Stephen Eule, Vice President for climate and technology at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy, at the February 25th Institute event discussing energy policy.  More information on the event is available at http://marshall.org/events/energy-policy-priorities-identifying-principles-and-actions/.

Market Forces: The Best Driver of Energy Policy

On November 4, 2013, Institute CEO William O’Keefe appeared at a conference sponsored by the Conservation Leadership Council to discuss a framework for energy policy making. His remarks are available in the attached document.

Opponents of US gas exports wrong

The export of American natural-gas reserves to allies in Asia, Europe and elsewhere is under consideration by Congress again this week. Approvals for new liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facilities are on hold indefinitely, but the economic and political benefits for the United States should it become a top exporter of LNG are too great to ignore.

THE CASE FOR EXPORTS: America’s Hydrocarbon Industry Can Revive the Economy and Eliminate the Trade Deficit

The world has changed since the passage of the 1975 Energy Policy and Conservation Act, a law that set the tone for energy policy for nearly a half-century. Technology and demographics have eviscerated old ideas of limits and import dependency. Given the new abundance, the United States now has the opportunity to become a major energy exporter.

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